Programs

Sled hockey, also known as sledge hockey, is a form of ice hockey that is designed for players who have physical disabilities that limit their mobility. In sled hockey, players sit in sleds that are mounted on two ice skate blades and use two shortened hockey sticks with picks on the ends to propel themselves across the ice and handle the puck.

Sled hockey is played on a standard ice hockey rink, with the same goals, blue lines, red line, and face-off circles. The game is played with six players on each team, including a goaltender, and follows most of the same rules as regular ice hockey.

The major difference in sled hockey is the way the players move on the ice. Because they are sitting in sleds, they cannot use their legs to skate. Instead, they use their arms and the picks on the ends of their sticks to move themselves around the ice. This requires a great deal of upper body strength and control.

Sled hockey has become an increasingly popular sport around the world, with many countries fielding national teams and competing in international competitions such as the Paralympic Games. It provides an opportunity for people with disabilities to participate in a challenging and exciting team sport and helps to promote physical activity, teamwork, and social integration.

Read more about our sled hockey team the CNY Flyers.

*** Check our calendar for updated times and location ***

Wheelchair basketball is a sport that is designed for athletes with physical disabilities that limit their ability to play basketball in the traditional standing position. In wheelchair basketball, players use specially designed wheelchairs to move around the court and play the game.

The rules of wheelchair basketball are similar to those of traditional basketball, with a few modifications to accommodate the use of wheelchairs. For example, players are not allowed to touch their feet to the ground while in possession of the ball, and they must dribble the ball at least once every two pushes of the wheelchair.

Wheelchair basketball is played on a standard basketball court, with the same size and shape of the court and baskets as traditional basketball. The game is played with two teams of five players each, with the objective of scoring points by shooting the ball through the opposing team’s basket.

The wheelchairs used in wheelchair basketball are specifically designed for the sport, with angled wheels that provide greater stability and maneuverability on the court. The chairs are also designed to be highly responsive, allowing players to make quick turns and stops.

Wheelchair basketball is a highly competitive sport, with many countries fielding national teams and competing in international competitions such as the Paralympic Games. It provides an opportunity for people with disabilities to participate in a challenging and exciting team sport and helps to promote physical activity, teamwork, and social integration.

*** Check our calendar for updated times and location ***

Adaptive kayaking is a form of kayaking that is designed for individuals with physical or cognitive disabilities. Adaptive kayaking involves the use of specialized kayaks and equipment that are modified to meet the unique needs of the paddler.

Adaptive kayaking can take many different forms, depending on the needs and abilities of the paddler. Some examples of adaptive kayaking include:

Sit-on-top kayaks: These kayaks have an open cockpit design, providing greater stability and ease of entry and exit. They can be used by individuals with mobility impairments, as well as those who have difficulty maintaining balance in a traditional kayak.

Tandem kayaks: Tandem kayaks are kayaks that are designed for two paddlers, with one paddler in the front and one in the back. They can be used by individuals with visual impairments or other conditions that make it difficult to kayak independently.

Kayaks with outriggers: Kayaks with outriggers have one or more floats attached to the side of the kayak, providing greater stability and balance. They can be used by individuals with balance or coordination impairments.

Hand-paddled kayaks: Hand-paddled kayaks are kayaks that are powered by the paddler’s arms, rather than their legs. They can be used by individuals with lower limb amputations or other conditions that limit lower limb function.

Adaptive kayaking provides many benefits for individuals with disabilities, including improved physical fitness, increased independence, and greater connection to the natural environment. It is a popular recreational activity, as well as a therapeutic tool for physical and occupational therapy. Adaptive kayaking programs and facilities are available in many locations, providing opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in this exciting and rewarding activity.

*** Check our calendar for updated times and location ***

Adaptive cycling, also known as inclusive cycling or para-cycling, is a form of cycling that is designed for individuals with physical or cognitive disabilities. Adaptive cycling involves the use of specialized bicycles or equipment that are modified to meet the unique needs of the rider.

Adaptive cycling can take many different forms, depending on the needs and abilities of the rider. Some examples of adaptive cycling include:

Handcycles: These are bicycles that are powered by the rider’s arms, rather than their legs. Handcycles can be used by individuals with lower limb amputations, spinal cord injuries, or other conditions that limit lower limb function.

Tricycles: Tricycles are bicycles with three wheels, providing greater stability and balance. They can be used by individuals with balance or coordination impairments, as well as those who have difficulty maintaining a seated position on a traditional bicycle.

Tandems: Tandems are bicycles that are designed for two riders, with one rider in front and one behind. They can be used by individuals with visual impairments or other conditions that make it difficult to ride a bicycle independently.

Recumbent bicycles: Recumbent bicycles are bicycles that allow the rider to sit in a reclined position, with their legs extended in front of them. They can be used by individuals with back pain, balance impairments, or other conditions that make it difficult to ride a traditional bicycle.

Adaptive cycling provides many benefits for individuals with disabilities, including improved physical fitness, increased independence, and greater social interaction. It is a popular recreational activity, as well as a competitive sport, with many countries fielding national teams and competing in international competitions such as the Paralympic Games.

*** Check our calendar for updated times and location ***

Wheelchair tennis is a sport that is adapted from traditional tennis for individuals who use wheelchairs due to physical disabilities. The sport follows the same basic rules as traditional tennis, with some modifications to accommodate the use of wheelchairs.

In wheelchair tennis, the players use specialized wheelchairs that are designed to be lightweight, agile, and responsive. The chairs have two large rear wheels and one or two smaller front wheels, which provide stability and mobility on the court. The chairs also have a modified seat, which is tilted forward to allow the player to reach the ball more easily.

The court and net dimensions in wheelchair tennis are the same as in traditional tennis, and the game is played with the same tennis balls. The scoring system and rules for serving and returning are also the same.

One of the key differences in wheelchair tennis is that the ball is allowed to bounce twice, rather than once, before it must be returned. This allows the players to position themselves and their chairs to make the best possible shot.

Wheelchair tennis is played by athletes of all ages and ability levels, from recreational players to elite athletes who compete in international competitions such as the Paralympic Games. The sport provides an opportunity for people with physical disabilities to participate in a challenging and exciting sport, and helps to promote physical activity, social interaction, and community engagement.

*** Check our calendar for updated times and location ***

Our family adaptive cycling is a fun activity for the whole family. This program is for individuals with or without physical disabilities who want to enjoy riding a bike again with family and friends.

This program is open to individuals who are just getting reacquainted with cycling as well as avid cyclers. Move Along has eight different hand cycles for you to try out. Come on out and enjoy the wind in your face the beautiful freedom cycling can bring.

We will meet at various linear Parks in our area so please check out our website for further information.

*** Check our calendar for updated times and location ***

Our Inclusive Sports program is focused on building up the students’ awareness of available adaptive sports for those individuals with mobility issues in an inclusive setting. These programs exist to help integrate both able-bodied and disabled individuals into inclusive sports opportunities.

Demonstrations Available:
Program/Presentation options available for Schools & Organizations

To help promote the general awareness of adaptive sports available today, Move Along offers three basic programs to engage students or adults. These programs enable the audience to understand the similarities to conventional able-bodied sports and a chance to experience the joy of adaptive sports. Move Along will offer custom variations of these programs should your needs be better served by this approach.

Limited group Demonstrations with two (2) Move Along volunteers: This program will cover their story and how & why they chose to start Move Along here in Central New York. The advantages that Adaptive sports bring to mobility-challenged individuals and secondary issues that participation in sports helps to address. This presentation includes a hands-on experience of your participants based on individual and group activities, assuming suitable space is available.

Due to limited volunteers, this program is geared toward older participants. Duration: 1-1/2 Hour presentation including Q & A
Large group presentation and hands-on demonstrations with three or four Move Along volunteers: This program is geared towards typical school-aged participants to help them better understand the range of adaptive sports options available and gives them a chance to experience firsthand to the pure fun of adaptive sports.

The advantages that Adaptive sports bring to mobility-challenged individuals and secondary issues that participation in sports helps to address. This presentation includes hands-on experience with your participants based on individual and group activities, assuming suitable space is available. Given the increased number of experienced volunteers, this program can accommodate all ability levels in your participant base.

Duration: 2-1/2 or 5-1/2 Hour presentations including Q & A
Equipment Available for Training:

Sports Wheelchairs – 20 sports wheelchairs in various sizes from small child to adult

Handcycles – 4 various models of hand cycles that can be used in a gym or outdoors for youth to adult

Sled Hockey Sleds – 6 sleds adapted to roll on gym floors suitable for all ages

For more information or to discuss your specific needs, please contact:

Wheelchair pickleball is a version of the popular paddle sport that is adapted for individuals who use wheelchairs due to physical disabilities. The game is similar to traditional pickleball, with some modifications to accommodate the use of wheelchairs.

In wheelchair pickleball, the players use specialized wheelchairs that are designed to be agile and responsive. The chairs have two large rear wheels and one or two smaller front wheels, which provide stability and mobility on the court. The chairs also have a modified seat, which is tilted forward to allow the player to reach the ball more easily.

The court dimensions in wheelchair pickleball are the same as in traditional pickleball, and the game is played with the same pickleball balls and paddles. The scoring system and rules for serving and returning are also the same.

One of the key differences in wheelchair pickleball is that the serve must be struck below the waist, as opposed to the traditional pickleball rule of serving underhand. This allows the players to better position themselves and their chairs to make the best possible shot.

Wheelchair pickleball is played by athletes of all ages and ability levels, from recreational players to competitive players who participate in tournaments and competitions. The sport provides an opportunity for people with physical disabilities to participate in a fun and challenging activity, while promoting physical activity, social interaction, and community engagement.

*** Check our calendar for updated times and location ***

The sled hockey booster club is a group of individuals, typically parents, alumni, and other supporters of our sled hockey team, they come together to support and promote the team’s activities. The main purpose of a booster club is to provide financial and moral support to the team and help organize and manage events and activities that benefit the team.

Our booster club typically raises funds through various means, such as ticket sales, merchandise sales, and fundraising events. These funds are used to purchase equipment, pay for travel expenses, and cover other expenses necessary to support the team.

In addition to fundraising, the booster club also help with team activities such as organizing team events, coordinating team trips, and providing support at games and practices. They are also responsible for promoting the team and creating a sense of community around the team.

The sled hockey booster club plays an important role in supporting the success of a hockey team, both on and off the ice.

Upcoming Events
March
15
2024

Syracuse Sled Hockey Classic 2024

4:00 PM  to  4:00 PM |