Flyers Glide to Victory in Adaptive Sports Showcase at Syracuse University

bridgING the gap between traditional and adaptive sports

Photographs by Jack Henry/thenewshouse.com

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — The Tennity Ice Pavilion on the campus of Syracuse University was the stage for an inspiring display of athleticism and spirit as the CNY Flyers took on the Syracuse University Men’s Club Hockey team in a sled hockey match that ended in a commanding 16-0 victory for the Flyers.

This event, organized for the second time, aimed to bridge the gap between traditional and adaptive sports, showcasing the skill and determination of athletes who play sled hockey, a version of ice hockey designed for players with physical disabilities. Seth Gitner, a board member of CNY Adaptive Sports and the Faculty Advisor for the Syracuse University Men’s Club Hockey, played a pivotal role in bringing this game to fruition, emphasizing the educational value and the spirit of inclusivity it brings to the community.

Members of the Syracuse Univeristy Men’s Hockey Club team fist bump each other for a job well done.

The Flyers, demonstrating exceptional skill and teamwork, dominated the game from the start, notching an impressive 72 shots on goal. Despite the Syracuse team’s efforts, they were unable to score, highlighting the Flyers’ defensive prowess and their goalie’s shutout performance.

A noteworthy aspect of the game was the presence of Myles Favata’s high school hockey team in the stands. Favata, a key player for the Flyers, received heartwarming support from his teammates, who came out to cheer him on, reciprocating the encouragement and support he has shown them from the sidelines.

Myles Favata with his Fusion Teammates who came out to support him.

“The game today wasn’t just about winning or losing; it was about demonstrating the power of sports to bring people together and celebrate the abilities of all athletes,” said Gitner. “Seeing the support Myles received from his high school team was a testament to the impact of these events beyond the ice.”

The match served as more than just a competition; it was a learning experience for the Syracuse students and the broader community. Attendees were given a firsthand look at the adaptability and competitiveness of sled hockey, fostering a greater understanding and appreciation for adaptive sports.

The success of this sled hockey game at Tennity Ice Pavilion underscores the growing interest and support for adaptive sports at Syracuse University and beyond. It represents a significant step toward a more inclusive sporting environment, where the love for the game transcends physical limitations.